Nikon D3100 with 18-55mm lens reviews and prices: SLR camera

803 customer reviews

This digital camera is a good all rounder.

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9.1 out of 10 based on 803 reviews.
Nikon D3100 with 18-55mm lens: 14.8 MP (Megapixels), SD Card storage, No image stabiliser digital SLR camera. See full product description

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Some customer reviews of Nikon D3100 with 18-55mm lens

Most helpful reviews

Ruth, Experienced amateur

Score 9.0/10
Good points:
Reviewer left no comment
Bad points:
The bag that comes with this camera in the deal is a little sung and could be slightly larger.
Overall rating 9.0
Ease of use 8.0
Image quality 9.0
Features 9.0
Build Quality 8.0
Value for money 9.0
Was this review helpful?
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4 of 6 people found this review helpful

Confirmed purchase: 29 Oct 2013

Andrew, Aberdeen Keen amateur

Score 9.0/10
Good points:
Easy to setup and use.
Excellent quality - good feel.
Bad points:
Reviewer left no comment
Overall rating 9.0
Ease of use 10.0
Image quality 9.0
Features 9.0
Build Quality 9.0
Value for money 10.0
Was this review helpful?
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3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Confirmed purchase: 22 Dec 2013

Suzanne, Dundee Keen amateur

Score 10.0/10
Good points:
Once you have the hang of things it is easy to use and it's a Nice light camera.
Bad points:
Reviewer left no comment
Overall rating 10.0
Ease of use 10.0
Image quality 10.0
Features 10.0
Build Quality 10.0
Value for money 10.0
Was this review helpful?
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2 of 4 people found this review helpful

Confirmed purchase: 15 Nov 2013

Angela , Ashford kent

Score 7.0/10
Good points:
I purchased it for my son's 18th birthday. He has previously used his friends similar camera. He found it easy to use, the pictures look great. He is really enjoying using it.
For the price, it would have been great if it came with a camera bag as well.
It was recommended to me, by his friend who is 24, who takes excellent pictures.
Bad points:
Reviewer left no comment
Overall rating 7.0
Ease of use 9.0
Image quality 8.0
Features 10.0
Build Quality 9.0
Value for money 9.0
Was this review helpful?
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3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Confirmed purchase: 14 Nov 2013

Jody, derby Point & shoot

Score 9.0/10
Good points:
Brilliant has a first camera, easy to use.
Bad points:
Not found any bad points.
Overall rating 9.0
Ease of use 8.0
Image quality 9.0
Features 8.0
Build Quality 9.0
Value for money 9.0
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3 of 5 people found this review helpful

Confirmed purchase: 07 Mar 2014

Josh, Brighton Keen amateur

Score 9.0/10
Good points:
Great for beginners, the guide mode is useful. Easy to use and work out, great feel to it, all buttons and switches placed well. Easy to read the manual, overall a good camera for amateur photographers. Great photo editor on the camera itself. I have managed to get some great photos and i'm still learning how to use the thing! would recommend to any one with under 500 pounds to spend. Very happy with it.
Bad points:
No USB cable, all though not a big deal seeing as you can just slot the memory card in the side of most laptops.
Built quality isn't what you would expect on a nikon DSLR, the memory card slot cover is loose, the shutter release button is a bit wobbly, being a bit picky here but they are the only things that let the camera down.
Overall rating 9.0
Ease of use 9.0
Image quality 9.0
Features 10.0
Build Quality 7.0
Value for money 9.0
Was this review helpful?
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Confirmed purchase: 02 Apr 2011

Confirmed purchaser

Score 8.0/10
Good points:

LaTeX/Floats, Figures and Captions
< LaTeX

LaTeX
Introduction
Absolute Beginners
Basics
Document Structure
Errors and Warnings
Titles
Bibliography Management
Tables
Formatting
Fonts
Page Layout
Mathematics
Advanced Mathematics
Theorems
Labels and Cross-referencing
Indexing
Glossary
Algorithms and Pseudocode
Letters
Teacher's Corner
Importing Graphics
Creating Graphics
Floats, Figures and Captions
Presentations
Hyperlinks
Colors
Packages
Advanced Topics
Customizing LaTeX
Multiple files
Collaborative Writing
Tips / Tricks
General Guidelines
Export To Other Formats
Internationalization
Accents and Special Characters
Useful Measurement Macros
Index
Command Glossary
edit this box
In the previous chapter, the importing of graphics was introduced. However, just having a picture stuck in-between paragraphs does not look professional. For starters, we want a way of adding captions, and to be able to cross-reference. What we need is a way of defining figures. It would also be good if LaTeX could apply similar principles to when it arranges text to look its best, to arranging pictures too. This is where floats come into play.
Contents [hide]
1 Floats
1.1 Figures
1.2 Figures with borders
1.3 Tables
2 Captions
2.1 Lists of figures and tables
2.2 Side captions
2.3 Labels and Cross-referencing
2.4 Wrapping text around figures
2.5 Tip for figures with too much white space
2.6 Subfloats
2.7 Wide figures in two column documents
2.8 Custom Floats
2.9 Caption Styles
3 Labels in the figures
3.1 Summary
4 References
[edit]Floats

Floats are containers for things in a document that cannot be broken over a page. LaTeX by default recognizes "table" and "figure" floats, but you can define new ones of your own (see Custom Floats below). Floats are there to deal with the problem of the object that won't fit on the present page, and to help when you really don't want the object here just now.
Floats are not part of the normal stream of text, but separate entities, positioned in a part of the page to themselves (top, middle, bottom, left, right, or wherever the designer specifies). They always have a caption describing them and they are always numbered so they can be referred to from elsewhere in the text. LaTeX automatically floats Tables and Figures, depending on how much space is left on the page at the point that they are processed. If there is not enough room on the current page, the float is moved to the top of the next page. This can be changed by moving the Table or Figure definition to an earlier or later point in the text, or by adjusting some of the parameters which control automatic floating.
Authors sometimes have many floats occurring in rapid succession, which raises the problem of how they are supposed to fit on the page and still leave room for text. In this case, LaTeX stacks them all up and prints them together if possible, or leaves them to the end of the chapter in protest. The skill is to space them out within your text so that they intrude neither on the thread of your argument or discussion, nor on the visual balance of the typeset pages.

[edit]Figures
To create a figure that floats, use the figure environment.
\begin{figure}[placement specifier]
... figure contents ...
\end{figure}
The previous section mentioned how floats are used to allow Latex to handle figures, whilst maintaining the best possible presentation. However, there may be times when you disagree, and a typical example is with its positioning of figures. The placement specifier parameter exists as a compromise, and its purpose is to give the author a greater degree of control over where certain floats are placed.
Specifier Permission
h Place the float here, i.e., approximately at the same point it occurs in the source text (however, not exactly at the spot)
t Position at the top of the page.
b Position at the bottom of the page.
p Put on a special page for floats only.
! Override internal parameters Latex uses for determining "good" float positions.
H Places the float at precisely the location in the LaTeX code. Requires the float package,[1] e.g., \usepackage{float}. This is somewhat equivalent to h!.
What you do with these placement permissions is to list which of the options that you wish to make available to LaTeX. These are simply possibilities, and Latex will decide when typesetting your document which of your supplied specifiers it thinks is best.
Use \listoffigures to add a list of the figures in the beginning of the document. To change the name used in the caption from Figure to Example, use \renewcommand{\figurename}{Example} in the figure contents.
[edit]Figures with borders
It's possible to get a thin border around all figures. You have to write the following once at the beginning of the document:
\usepackage{float}
\floatstyle{boxed}
\restylefloat{figure}
The border will not include the caption.
[edit]Tables
Although tables have already been covered, it was only the internal syntax that was discussed. The tabular environment that was used to construct the tables is not a float by default. Therefore, for tables you wish to float, wrap the tabular environment within a table environment, like this:
\begin{table}
\begin{tabular}{...}
... table data ...
\end{tabular}
\end{table}
You may feel that it is a bit long winded, but such distinctions are necessary, because you may not want all tables to be treated as a float.
Use \listoftables to add a list of the tables in the beginning of the document.
[edit]Captions

It is always good practice to add a caption to any figure or table. Fortunately, this is very simple in LaTeX. All you need to do is use the \caption{text} command within the float environment. Because of how LaTeX deals sensibly with logical structure, it will automatically keep track of the numbering of figures, so you do not need to include this within the caption text.
The location of the caption is traditionally underneath the float. However, it is up to you to therefore insert the caption command after the actual contents of the float (but still within the environment). If you place it before, then the caption will appear above the float. Try out the following example to demonstrate this effect:
\documentclass[a4paper,12pt]{article}

\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\begin{document}

\begin{figure}[h!]
\caption{A picture of a gull.}
\centering
\includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{gull}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h!]
\centering
\reflectbox{%
\includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{gull}}
\caption{A picture of the same gull
looking the other way!}
\end{figure}

\begin{table}[h!]
\begin{center}
\begin{tabular}{| l c r |}
\hline
1 & 2 & 3 \\
4 & 5 & 6 \\
7 & 8 & 9 \\
\hline
\end{tabular}
\end{center}
\caption{A simple table}
\end{table}

Notice how the tables and figures
have independent counters.

\end{document}

note that the command \reflectbox{...} flips its content horizontally.
[edit]Lists of figures and tables
Captions can be listed at the beginning of a paper or report in a "List of Tables" or a "List of Figures" section by using the \listoftables or \listoffigures commands, respectively. The caption used for each figure will appear in these lists, along with the figure numbers, and page numbers that they appear on.
The \caption command also has an optional parameter, \caption[short]{long} which is used for the List of Tables or List of Figures. Typically the short description is for the caption listing, and the long description will be placed beside the figure or table. This is particularly useful if the caption is long, and only a "one-liner" is desired in the figure/table listing. Here is an example of this usage:
\documentclass[12pt]{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}

\begin{document}

\listoffigures

\section{Introduction}

\begin{figure}[hb]
\centering
\includegraphics[width=4in]{gecko}
\caption[Close up of \textit{Hemidactylus} sp.]%
{Close up of \textit{Hemidactylus} sp., which is
part the genus of the gecko family. It is the
second most speciose genus in the family.}
\end{figure}

\end{document}

[edit]Side captions
It is sometimes desirable to have a caption appear on the side of a float, rather than above or below. The sidecap package can be used to place a caption beside a figure or table. The following example demonstrates this for a figure by using a SCfigure environment in place of the figure environment.
\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[pdftex]{graphicx}
\usepackage{sidecap}

\begin{document}

\begin{SCfigure}
\centering
\includegraphics[width=5\textwidth]%
{Giraff_picture}% picture filename
\caption{ ... caption text ... }
\end{SCfigure}

\end{document}

[edit]Labels and Cross-referencing
Labels and cross-references work fairly similarly to the general case - see the Labels and Cross-referencing section for more information.
Warning: If you want to label a figure so that you can reference it later, you have to add the label after the caption (inside seems to work in LaTeX 2e) but inside the floating environment. If it is declared outside, it will give the section number. If the label picks up the section or list number instead of the figure number, put the label inside the caption to ensure correct numbering.
[edit]Wrapping text around figures
Although not normally the case in academic writing, an author may prefer that some floats do not break the flow of text, but instead allow text to wrap around it. (Obviously, this effect only looks decent when the figure in question is significantly narrower than the text width.)
A word of warning: Wrapping figures in LaTex will require a lot of manual adjustment of your document. There are several packages available for the task, but none of them work perfectly. Before you make the choice of including figures with text wrapping in your document, make sure you have considered all the options. For example, you could use a layout with two columns for your documents and have no text-wrapping at all.
Anyway, we will look at the package wrapfig. (Note: wrapfig may not come with the default installation of LaTeX; you might need to install additional packages manually.)
To use wrapfig, you must first add this to the preamble:
\usepackage{wrapfig}
This then gives you access to:
\begin{wrapfigure}[lineheight]{alignment}{width}
Alignment can normally be either l for left, or r for right. Lowercase l or r forces the figure to start precisely where specified (and may cause it to run over page breaks), while capital L or R allows the figure to float. If you defined your document as twosided, the alignment can also be i for inside or o for outside, as well as I or O. The width is, of course, the width of the figure. An example:
\begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.48\textwidth]{gull}
\end{center}
\caption{A gull}
\end{wrapfigure}

Note that we have specified a size for both the wrapfigure environment and the image we have included. We did it in terms of the text width: it is always better to use relative sizes in LaTeX, let LaTeX do the work for you! The "wrap" is slightly bigger than the picture, so the compiler will not return any strange warning and you will have a small white frame between the image and the surrounding text. You can change it to get a better result, but if you don't keep the image smaller than the "wrap", you will see the image over the text, and this shouldn't be the effect you want to get!
The wrapfig package can also be used with user-defined floats with float package. See below in the section on custom floats.
[edit]Tip for figures with too much white space
It happens that you'll generate figures with too much (or too little) white space on the top or bottom. In such a case, you can simply make use of the optional argument [lineheight]. It specifies the height of the figure in number of lines of text.
Another possibility is adding space within the float using the \vspace{...} command. The argument is the size of the space you want to add, you can use any unit you want, including pt, mm, in, etc. If you provide a negative argument, it will add a negative space, thus removing some white space. Here is an example, the code is exactly the one of the previous case, we just added some negative vertical spaces to shrink everything up:
\begin{wrapfigure}{r}{0.5\textwidth}
\vspace{-20pt}
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.48\textwidth]{gull}
\end{center}
\vspace{-20pt}
\caption{A gull}
\vspace{-10pt}
\end{wrapfigure}

In this case it may look too shrunk, but you can manage spaces the way you like. In general, it is best not to add any space at all: let LaTeX do the formatting work!
Alternatively you might use the picins package instead of the wrapfigure package which produces a correct version without the excess white space out of the box without any hand tuning.
There is also an alternative to wrapfig: the package floatflt [1] - for documentation see [2].
[edit]Subfloats
A useful extension is the subfig package [3], which uses subfloats within a single float. This gives the author the ability to have subfigures within figures, or subtables within table floats. Subfloats have their own caption, and an optional global caption. An example will best illustrate the usage of this package:
\usepackage{subfig}

\begin{figure}
\centering
\subfloat[A gull]{\label{fig:gull}\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{gull}}
\subfloat[A tiger]{\label{fig:tiger}\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{tiger}}
\subfloat[A mouse]{\label{fig:mouse}\includegraphics[width=0.3\textwidth]{mouse}}
\caption{Pictures of animals}
\label{fig:animals}
\end{figure}

You will notice that the figure environment is set up as usual. You may also use a table environment for subtables. For each subfloat, you need to use:
\subfloat[sub caption]{ ... figure or table ... }
If you intend to cross-reference any of the subfloats, see where the label is inserted; \caption will provide the global caption.
subfig will arrange the figures or tables side-by-side providing they can fit, otherwise, it will automatically shift subfloats below. This effect can be added manually, by putting the newline command (\\) before the figure you wish to move to a newline.
Horizontal spaces between figures is controlled by one of several commands, which are placed in between each \subfloat{} command:
Any whitespace (such as spaces, returns, and tabs) will result in one regular space
Math spaces: \qquad, \quad, \;, and \,
Generic space: \hspace{length}
[edit]Wide figures in two column documents
If you are writing a document using two columns (i.e. you started your document with something like \documentclass[twocolumn]{article}), you might have noticed that you can't use floating elements that are wider than the width of a column (using a LaTeX notation, wider than 0.5\textwidth), otherwise you will see the image overlapping with text. If you really have to use such wide elements, the only solution is to use the "starred" variants of the floating environments, that are {figure*} and {table*}. Those "starred" versions work exactly like the standard ones, but they will be as wide as the page, so you will get no overlapping.
A bad point of those environments is that they can be placed only at the top of the page or on their own page. If you try to specify their position using modifiers like b or h they will be ignored. Add \usepackage{stfloats} to the preamble in order to alleviate this problem with regard to placing these floats at the bottom of a page, using the optional specifier [b]. Default is [tbp]. However, h still does not work.
To prevent the figures from being placed out-of-order with respect to their "non-starred" counterparts, the package fixltx2e [2] should be used (e.g. \usepackage{fixltx2e}).
[edit]Custom Floats
If tables and figures are not adequate for your needs, then you always have the option to create your own! Examples of such instances could be source code examples, or maps. For a program float example, one might therefore wish to create a float named program. The package float is your friend for this task. All commands to set up the new float must be placed in the preamble, and not within the document.
Add \usepackage{float} to the preamble of your document
Declare your new float using: \newfloat{type}{placement}{ext}[outer counter], where:
type - the new name you wish to call your float, in this instance, 'program'.
placement - t, b, p, or h (as previously described in Placement), where letters enumerate permitted placements.
ext - the file name extension of an auxiliary file for the list of figures (or whatever). Latex writes the captions to this file.
outer counter - the presence of this parameter indicates that the counter associated with this new float should depend on outer counter, for example 'chapter'.
The default name that appears at the start of the caption is the type. If you wish to alter this, use \floatname{type}{floatname}
Changing float style can be issued with \floatstyle{style} (Works on all subsequent \newfloat commands, therefore, must be inserted before \newfloat to be effective).
plain - the normal style for Latex floats, i.e., nothing!
boxed - a box is drawn that surrounds the float, and the caption is printed below.
ruled - the caption appears above the float, with rules immediately above and below. Then the float contents, followed by a final horizontal rule.
Float styles can also be customized as the second example below illustrates.
An example document using a new program float type:
\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{float}

\floatstyle{ruled}
\newfloat{program}{thp}{lop}
\floatname{program}{Program}

\begin{document}

\begin{program}
\begin{verbatim}

class HelloWorldApp {
public static void main(String[] args) {
//Display the string
System.out.println("Hello World!");
}
}
\end{verbatim}
\caption{The Hello World! program in Java.}
\end{program}

\end{document}
The verbatim environment is an environment that is already part of Latex. Although not introduced so far, its name is fairly intuitive! Latex will reproduce everything you give it, including new lines, spaces, etc. It is good for source code, but if you want to introduce a lot of code you might consider using the listings package, that was made just for it.
While this is useful, one should be careful when embedding the float within another float. In particular, the error not in outer par mode may occur. One solution might be to use the [H] option (not any other) on the inner float, as this option "pins" the inner float to the outer one.
Newly created floats with newfloat can also be used in combination with the wrapfig package from above. E.g. the following code creates a floating text box, which floats in the text on the right side of the page and is complete with caption, numbering, an index file with the extension .lob and a customization of the float's visual layout:
\documentclass{article}

% have hyperref package before float in order to get strange errors with .\theHfloatbox
\usepackage[pdftex]{hyperref}

\usepackage{float}

%allows use of "@" before \begin{document}
\makeatletter

% this creates a custom and simpler ruled box style
\newcommand\floatc@simplerule[2]{{\@fs@cfont #1 #2}\par}
\newcommand\fs@simplerule{\def\@fs@cfont{\bfseries}\let\@fs@capt\floatc@simplerule
\def\@fs@pre{\hrule height.8pt depth0pt \kern4pt}%
\def\@fs@post{\kern4pt\hrule height.8pt depth0pt \kern4pt \relax}%
\def\@fs@mid{\kern8pt}%
\let\@fs@iftopcapt\iftrue}

% this code block defines the new and custom floatbox float environment
\floatstyle{simplerule}
\newfloat{floatbox}{thp}{lob}[section]
\floatname{floatbox}{Text Box}

\begin{document}

\begin{floatbox}{r}{}
\textit{Bootstrapping} is a resampling technique used
for robustly estimating statistical quantities, such as
the model fit $R^2$. It offers some protection against
the sampling bias.
\caption{Bootstrapping}
\end{floatbox}

\end{document}
[edit]Caption Styles
To change the appearance of captions, use the caption [4] package. For example, to make all caption labels small and bold:
\usepackage[small,bf]{caption}
The KOMA script packages [5] have their own caption customizing features with e.g. \captionabove, \captionformat and \setcapwidth. However these definitions have limited effect on newly created float environments with the wrapfig package.
[edit]Labels in the figures

There is a LaTeX package lpic to put LaTeX on top of included graphics, thus allowing to add TeX annotations to imported graphics. It defines a convenient interface to put TeX over included graphics, and allows for drawing a white background under the typeset material to overshadow the graphics. It is a better alternative for labels inside of graphics; you do not have to change text size when rescaling pictures, and all LaTeX power is available for labels.
A very similar package, with somewhat different syntax, is pinlabel. The link given also points to the packages psfrag and overpic.
[edit]Summary
That concludes all the fundamentals of floats. You will hopefully see how much easier it is to let Latex do all the hard work and tweak the page layouts in order to get your figures in the best place. As always, the fact that LaTeX takes care of all caption and reference numbering is a great time saver.

Previous: Importing Graphics Index Next: Presentations
This page uses material from Andy Roberts' Getting to grips with Latex with permission from the author.

[edit]References

↑ http://www.ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/float/
↑ http://www.tex.ac.uk/cgi-bin/texfaq2html?label=2colfltorder
Category: LaTeX
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LaTeX
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LaTeX is a featured book on Wikibooks because it contains substantial content, it is well-formatted, and the Wikibooks community has decided to feature it on the main page or in other places. Please continue to improve it and thanks for the great work so far! You can edit its advertisement template. This book is also available as a print version and as a PDF version.


This is a guide to the LaTeX markup language. It is intended that this can serve as a useful resource for everyone from new users who wish to learn, to old hands who need a quick reference.

A PDF version is available. Last updated 5th September 2008, 3.9 MB. (info)

Wikipedia has related information at TeX and LaTeX
[edit]Contents




If you have questions related to LaTeX, ask at the Q&A.
Introduction
Absolute Beginners
Basics
Document Structure
Errors and Warnings
Title Creation
Bibliography Management
Tables
Formatting
Page Layout
Mathematics
Advanced Mathematics
Theorems
Labels and Cross-referencing
Indexing
Glossary
Algorithms and Pseudocode
Letters
Importing Graphics
Creating Graphics
Floats, Figures and Captions
Presentations
Hyperlinks
Colors
Packages
Installing Extra Packages
Advanced Topics
Teacher's Corner
Package Reference
Fonts
Customizing LaTeX
Multiple files
Collaborative Writing of LaTeX Documents
Tips and Tricks
General Guidelines
Export To Other Formats
Internationalization
Accents and Special Characters
Links
Authors
[edit]Appendices
Installation
Useful Measurement Macros
Useful Size Commands
Sample LaTeX documents
Index
Command Glossary
More Bibliographies
[edit]Other wikibooks

TeX
Subjects: LaTeX | Markup languages
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This page was last modified on 13 January 2011, at 02:34.
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Privacy policyAbout WikibooksDisclaimers
Overall rating 8.0
Ease of use 8.0
Image quality 8.0
Features 8.0
Build Quality 8.0
Value for money 8.0
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Confirmed purchase: 01 Jan 2011

Product Features

Camera Type SLR
Resolution (Pixels) 4608x3072
Screen size (Inches) 3
Type of image stabiliser No
Touchscreen No
3D No
Colour Black
Media format SDXC Card
Media format SDHC Card
Media format SD Card
PictBridge Yes
Macro Mode No
Video recorder Yes
Manual Focus Yes
Timer Yes
Weight (g) 455
Flash Yes
Body Only No
WiFi No
Shortest shutter speed (Fractions of a second) 1/4000
Longest shutter speed (Fractions of a second) 1/30
Waterproof No
Viewfinder Yes
USB port Yes
Dimensions (mm) 124x96x74.5
RAW Format Yes
GPS Receiver No
Release date 40422
Release date 2010/08/20
Release date 2010-08-20
Height in mm 9.6
Width in mm 124.5
Depth in mm 7.5
Serial Shot Mode Yes
Bluetooth No
Autofocus Yes
Changeable Lens Yes

Also known as: D3100 with 18-55mm II, Nikon D3100 SLR 18-55mm Lens, Nikon D3100 18-55mm Lens, D3100 with 18-55mm VR, Nikon D3100 with 18-55mm VR, Nikon D3100 18.55MM Lens,

Digital Cameras Buyers' Guide  

Manufacturer's Description

Nikon D3100
The Nikon D3100 is a 14.2 Megapixel DSLR camera with high sensitivity CMOS sensor, Live View, Full HD Movies and helpful Guide Mode.

14 Megapixel CMOS Sensor
The CMOS sensor housed within the Nikon D3100 has 14.2 effective megapixels for outstandingly sharp images. The high sensitivity of the sensor means that up to ISO 3200 values are within the normal range and can even be extended to ISO 12,800 in HI 2 Mode. The EXPEED 2 Engine keeps noise to a minimum and allows for fast response times.

Guide Mode
The improved Guide Mode on the D3100 is full of helpful navigational tools and graphic illustrations of camera settings known as “Assist Images” – for example showing the effect of wider apertures on depth of field and overall sharpness.

Full HD D-Movie
Record full 1080 HD movies with the D3100 with the option also to record in standard definition. The AF-F (Full Time Servo AF) enables continuous focusing in Live View while recording movies. This removes the need to keep the shutter release half pressed to allow the camera to focus. Movie editing is also possible on-camera.

Scene Auto Selector
When Auto mode or Auto (no flash) mode is selected, the Scene Auto Selector chooses from Portrait, Landscape, Closeup and Night Portrait modes automatically.

Additional Features

Face Detection for up to 35 faces in a frame
Independent Movie Record Button and Release Mode Selector
CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) for HDMI connection – allows remote controlled playback of images and movies when connected to a HD TV.
Improved Exposure Compensation algorithm
View NX2 Software included
11 Point AF
3.0” LCD Monitor
3fps Continuous Shooting


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